Posts Tagged ‘breast cancer’

breast cancer support

Sep 15

Breast Cancer Journey: The Cost Of Cancer Care

Breast Cancer Journey: The Cost Of Cancer Care

Susie Turrey is a breast cancer survivor who wanted to share her breast cancer journey with us. We thank her for telling her story.

Susie writes, “My breast cancer journey was not only an emotional, physical and spiritual experience, it was a financial journey as well.  I’ve written about my journey on my blog, but today I want to talk about the cost of cancer care, even with good insurance.  Now that treatment’s almost a year ago, I can talk about money.”

Breast Cancer Journey: The Cost Of Cancer Care (more…)

Sep 06

Bowling for Boobies

by Jan James, Founder

On August 28, 2016, Provision Project hosted our first-ever “Bowling for Boobies” event in Mesa, AZ.

Volunteers got to the AMF Mesa Lanes early to help set up raffle prizes, prayer bears and “booby cupcakes,” all to help raise money for women in active treatment for breast cancer.

Then all of a sudden, it happened.

They came.

It was definitely an (more…)

Sep 04

When You Find Yourself in the Deep Dark

Final post in a series on Life After Cancer.

by Lynne Hartke

When my husband was in college, he and a group of friends went spelunking in an undeveloped cave near Columbia, Missouri called Devil’s Icebox.

Unbeknownst to them, while they spent hours exploring the the 6.25 miles of underground passages, it had started raining. When they attempted to return to the entrance, through a narrow tunnel where they had to meander like snakes on their bellies, they noticed the water was rising.

The only place to gasp for air was when there was a break in the rocks in the ceiling. An air pocket. In the scramble to get out of the narrow section and save their lives, all the lights in their carbide head lamps got drenched.

Their lights extinguished.

(more…)

Aug 28

Relationship Challenges After Cancer

Cancer does not only touch our lives. Cancer touches the lives of those closest to us. How to we handle the relationship challenges and losses?  Continuing in a series on Life After Cancer.

 

 by Lynne Hartke

 “Will you die like Grandma?” my then-sixteen-year-old daughter asked when I told her I had breast cancer.

“One day [my son] saw me struggling to sit up,” Tina wrote about a time after her mastectomy. “I couldn’t hug him due to the pain. He stood against the wall, and I saw fear in his eyes. No child should ever have to fear the appearance of their mother… but there it was…that look of fear. Even as I write this, the tears start welling up.”

Cancer does not only touch our lives. Cancer touches the lives of those closest to us.

(more…)

Aug 21

The Emotional Upheaval After Cancer or A Fish Out of Water

After cancer treatment, many survivors feel like a fish out of water, on the outside looking in, with emotions all over the place. How do you fit into life again?  This is the third in a series on Life After Cancer.

 

 by Lynne Hartke

“I had a wedding to attend in Las Vegas,” Denise wrote when I asked her about the emotional changes and losses of life after cancer. “I was determined to attend. The wedding was for a daughter of a dear childhood friend. The date was circled, labeled and engraved in stone. The good news is that I made it to the wedding, but it was a challenge. Probably more mental, than physical. I had about 1/4 inch of hair, boyish looking and the ugliest slate-gray EVER since I wasn’t allowed to color it yet.”

 “I found a dress; it was okay, but having lost ten pounds [from treatment], I just didn’t even feel like I looked good at all! At the reception, I can remember feeling like a ‘fish out of water.’”

(more…)

Aug 14

The Physical Losses of Cancer

As cancer survivors, we all sacrificed parts of our bodies in the hope that we would live. Later we realized the physical losses of cancer were only the beginning.  This is Part 2 in a series of Life After Cancer. 

by Lynne Hartke

Several years ago, while our daughter was asleep and home alone, a burglar entered our house through an unlocked window.

Let me rephrase that.

A BURGLAR CAME INTO OUR HOUSE WHILE OUR DAUGHTER WAS HOME ALONE AND SLEEPING! (more…)

Aug 07

First the Earth Shook: Life After Cancer

For every cancer survivor, first the ground shakes. Then the tsunami comes. The only difference is the number of waves.  Physical losses. Relationship Challenges. Emotional Upheaval. It’s a wonder we don’t drown in it all. A 5-part series by blogger and 7-year breast cancer survivor, Lynne Hartke: Life After Cancer.

by Lynne Hartke

“Whomever reads a map, explores a place with their mind.”

The words are displayed next to two maps at the Visitors’ Center in Paracas, a small fishing community on the coastline of Peru. The exhibit implied that Paracas can be best understood after studying the two maps. The topographical map showed the elevation changes of a desert plain. The nautical map showed a community affected by its location to the sea.

I smiled when I read the words because I have never been good at maps. I am directionally-challenged. At our hostel, the night before, I had taken three wrong turns to find the kitchen. Maps confuse me. As I stared at the maps on the wall, Juan Carlos, our tour guide, motioned us to move on to the next exhibit.

Vamanos amigos. Come this way, friends.

(more…)

Nov 09

Arizona Mom Benefits From Provision Project

No one should have to make a decision between, “Should I pay my mortgage, utilities, buy groceries or miss out on a medical treatment?” This is especially true when you’re a single mom who is battling Stage 4 cancer. This was exactly the situation that Arizona mom, Tiffany, found herself in several months ago.

“In 2004 I was diagnosed with Stage 1 breast cancer. I found out I was five weeks pregnant right before my mastectomy was scheduled,” she shared. Tiffany had her daughter, Ezri, in February, had her mastectomy and went on Tamoxifen.

In 2010, “My oncologist said I was ‘considered cured,’” she said. “He didn’t really base it on anything scientific.  It was just his opinion.” Then in January 2011, she asked her regular doctor if she’d run a tumor marker test. “In February 2011 I found out the cancer had metastasized to the bone, and I was Stage 4.”

She started immediate, high levels of chemo. During all of this, her daughter’s father left, and Tiffany was a newly single parent on disability struggling to pay the bills while fighting cancer. “I used up my savings.  My family had a fundraiser to help me out while I waited for the disability payments to come in,” she said, adding, “I was living on less than half of my income with 100% of the bills being my responsibility along with my treatments.” (more…)